Archive for September, 2011

Miami manhole covers

Posted: September 30, 2011 in manhole covers
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SEWER

 
 
 
 
 

The two Snowmaggedon events of 2010 dumped record amounts of snow in Washington DC. The sidewalks became mostly impassable to pedestrians, and the streets became mostly impassable to vehicles.  And so the pedestrians took to the street, and the street became a sidewalk.

Connecticut Avenue near Dupont Circle

 

Connecticut Avenue near Dupont Circle

CENTRAL ARKANSAS WATER

SANITARY SEWER (Hot Springs, Arkansas)

 

COMMUNICATION (Little Rock)

Hot Springs

Here are some sidewalks from the picturesque village of Sintra.

Portuguese pavement in Sintra

 

Another use of Portuguese pavement

 

The disappearing sidewalk of Sintra

 

 

Most of the manhole covers in Denver’s Lower Downtown Historic District have the same design, as you can see below. I found the uniform design a little boring.

Lower Downtown Historic District -- PsCo ELECTRIC

Lower Downtown Historic District -- ATS

Lower Downtown Historic District -- SANITARY

Lower Downtown Historic District -- STORM

DEETER FOUNDRY INC -- 22 -- LINCOLN NEBR -- RID COMMUNICATION

Water

FORD METER BOX CO -- IRRIGATION -- WABASH INDIANA

WATER

Lower Downtown Historic District - WATER

PEPCO Manhole Covers

Posted: September 21, 2011 in manhole covers
Tags: ,

These photos were taken in Washington DC.

NEENAH FOUNDRY CO -- PEPCO -- MADE IN USA

PEPCO

NEENAH FOUNDRY CO -- PEPCO -- MADE IN USA

PEP CO.

NEENAH FOUNDRY CO -- PEPCO -- MADE IN USA

PEPCO

 

PEPCO -- MADE IN USA --

PEPCO

PEPCO

Stepping on Portuguese pavement in Lisbon is like eating cheesesteak in Philadelphia, or drinking Starbucks coffee in Seattle– it’s experiencing a creation in its original environment. I was overwhelmed by the sheer variety and quantity of Portuguese pavement I came across in Lisbon. Here’s an overview.

The wave pattern is a classic:

Praca da Figueira

Padrao dos Descobrimentos in Belem

 Portuguese pavement can be found on the streets as well as on sidewalks. Here’s one interesting use:

 

A geometric design on a side street:

Portuguese pavement has both form and function. At one extreme, it can be thought of as a tool of artistic expression, exemplified in this plaza in Belem:

Belem

Here’s a practical application of Portuguese pavement– 84 and 86 are the building numbers, and Tabacos is a reference to the product sold by the store next door. The assumption is that the store  will continue operating for the long haul– otherwise etching the product name into the pavement would not be very practical.